Year Summary


Well, it’s been a busy year and I have not had a chance to really promote anything. So here is a quick summary of the past year.

In October 2017, my article Last Days of Storyville was published in New Orleans Magazine. The article covered, among other things, the “Miser King of the Tenderloin;” the nefarious behavior of “Mother Beer;” the crucial differences between table girls, dance hall girls, and prostitutes; the Pimps and Procurers club; the attempted segregation of Storyville and how it lead to the first black high school in the city; and Mayor Martin Behrman’s repeated attempts to avoid closing down the district.

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In November 2017, two different tricentennial books I contributed essays for were published.

New Orleans: The First 300 Yearswas published by Pelican Publishing Company and edited by Errol Laborde and Peggy Scott Laborde. It has a foreword by Lawrence Powell, introduction by John Kemp, and essays by: Robert Cangelosi, Jr., John Kemp, Raphael Cassimere, Peter Ricchiuti, Errol Laborde, Angus Lind, Ian McNulty, John Magill, Dawn Wilson, Suzanne Pfefferle Tafur, Stephanie Bruno, Richard Campanella, Brobson Lutz, Susan Larson, Connie Zeanah Atkinson, Dominic Massa, Robert Dupont, Lolis Eric Elie, Marty Mule, and Patricia Brady.

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My essay is called “Street Names: Gathering the Blocks.” It focuses on the naming of street names over the last 50 years.

New Orleans & The World: 1718 – 2018was published by the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities and edited by Nancy Dixon; with forewords by Walter Isaacson & Leah Chase, Richard Campanella, and Lawrence Powell; and essays by: Daniel Usner, Brigitta Malm, Freddi Williams Evans, Nancy Dixon, Laura D. Kelley, Justin Nystrom, Helen Freund, Patrina Peters and Maurice Carlos Ruffin, Richard Campanella, Robert Dupont, Jack Davis, Jon Kukla, Erin Greenwald, Lawrence Powell, Keith Weldon Medley, Pamela Tyler, Jerry Strahan, Kara Tucina Olidge, Emily Clark, Rev. Dwight Webster, C.W. Cannon, Alecia Long, Zella Palmer, Sally Reeves, Allison Alsup, Brian Costello, Brian Boyles, S. Derby Gisclair, John Shelton Reed, Bruce Boyd Rayburn, Alison Fenstertock, Alex Rawls, David Dennis, Katy Reckdahl, and Dr. Michael White.

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My essay is called “Cities of the Dead,” about how New Orleans cemeteries evolved through necessity and diversity.

In April 2018, my article Bienville’s Tattoos was published in New Orleans Magazine. The article covered, among other things, Bienville’s tattoos (and he had quite a few), his influence on New Orleans, and the thwarted attempt to rename City Park after him during the bicentennial.

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In June, my article on Mrs. Alice Monahan – New Orleans’ first policewoman – was published in Louisiana Cultural Vistas. What a woman! Originally hired to help cleanup Milneburg, she was later moved to Storyville to assist fallen women and wayward girls.

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In July, I was extremely honored to win first prize for feature writing from the Press Club of New Orleans for my article on Storyville. I am very thankful to New Orleans Magazine for nominating me.

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And on November 6, 2018, my first children’s book – The Mermaids of New Orleans – was published… More on that later!

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DJANGO BOY ASHER (2008 – 2018)


Sweet Boy

After a valiant year-and-a-half battle with cancer, Django Boy Asher left this world on August 21st. He is survived by his soulmate Fannie Pie Asher, his daddy John Haffner, and his mommy Sally Asher.

 

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Despite his short time on earth, Django had many accomplishments. He was an acclaimed writer, co-authoring three books with Fannie: At Dog River,The Snuggle Book, and Adventure is Everywhere.They further collaborated in creating the Ambush Game.

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Django was a graduate of not one, but two beginning obedience classes where he was singled out as the star pupil. Alert and focused the moment he stepped in the classroom, Django strived in an environment where humans walked around with shredded chicken in their pockets. His professors were shocked (and in awe) of their young pupil’s ability to maintain a boner throughout entire class. The. Entire. Class. Django’s ability for concentration and focus shone in other areas of his life, for example his refusal to ever acknowledge the existence of his mommy’s cat Zelda, his mastery of sitting, and his laser-like honing skills when a walk or treat was essential to maintaining the universe.

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Like his namesake Django Reinhardt, Django was a virtuoso of sound and depth and often performed for his family but primarily for the simple art of joyful expression and release. A student of mindfulness, Django was a disciple of zazen, practicing regularly; a keen navigator always willing to lend his vision to reach the destination; and an 11thdegree snuggler.

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Most of all, he was the embodiment of love. Whether big hugs, wet kisses, a pink tip, radiant smiles, or just a sweet paw to let you know you he had you – he was all heart.

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He was a bright comet, an extraordinary miracle, a priceless gift. He was an angel on earth.

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Django’s passions included: cheese, navigating, snuggling, cheese, sticks, snuggling, popcorn, meditating, snuggling, cheese, romps, and snuggling.

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Although the Sweetest Boy’s time on this earth was short, Django’s legacy will be the importance to live a life of authenticity and to love with a full and open heart.

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He is dearly, dearly missed. Services will be private.

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2017 Events

Wow, I am really behind on posting. But I am working – I promise!

Here is the archive of 2017 events!

Wednesday, January 11th: Private lecture for the Stuart Clan.

Thursday, February 9th: “The Underworld Above Ground: The Graves of the Infamous, Nefarious, and Notorious of New Orleans.” Lecture on some of New Orleans infamous characters, revealing their forgotten stories and where they are buried. Part of Save Our Cemeteries lecture series. Dramatic readings of historical source by Kate Kuen and Andrew Ward. At Lake Lawn Metairie Funeral Home (5100 Pontchartrain Blvd). 6:30pm. Free and open to the public.

Friday, March 3rd: Debut of documentary short “Carnival in Storyville” on Steppin’ Out on WYES/TV Channel 12. &:30pm and 11:00pm/ Part of Pocket Door Productions. A documentary I wrote and co-produced with Kerry Cahill. Directed by Eva Contis.

Saturday, March 18th: “Stories From New Orleans Neighborhoods, Streets, and Cemeteries.” Joint lecture with Maggy Baccinelli presented by the Algiers Historical Society. At the Algiers Regional Library (3014 Holiday Drive). 10am. Free and open to the public.

Wednesday, March 22nd: “Where Sex and Sin Were the Specialities: An Evening of Storyville Memories.” Part of the Tennessee Williams Festival. At the Le Petit Theatre (616 St. Peter St). 8pm. Tickets for $35/$65. Description of the event: Join us for a look inside the scandalous history and culture of the Red Light District that flourished in New Orleans from 1897-1917, that famed neighborhood that fixed the city firmly in the national consciousness as a place of licentious pleasure. One hundred years after its closure, it still illuminates New Orleans’s complex personality. Pamela Arceneaux, senior librarian and rare books curator of The Historic New Orleans Collection introduces us to the rare guides to the district chronicled in her new book, Guidebooks to Sin: The Blue Books of Storyville, New Orleans. She’ll explain how the books served up the flavor of the place – guides to brothels, liquor stores, cures for venereal disease—and what rare and fascinating information she found between the lines. Writer and photographer Sally Asher of Tulane University, accompanied by actors Kerry Cahill and Andrew Ward, brings to life the important year of 1917, the year Storyville closed, after reform movements prevailed against last-ditch efforts to save it. “The purity wave” as is it was called—with tougher enforcement of the laws and an attempt to segregate the district—grew out of protests by women’s organizations and Mayor Behrman’s desire to control the district so it could continue to exist. Nina Bozak of The Historic New Orleans Collection dazzles with period dances—from the Two-Step that was the rage in the 1890s to the Foxtrot, for which the Original Dixieland Jazz Band recorded the Livery Stable Blues in 1917 (the first jazz recording ever issued), as well as dances to Spanish-tinged rhythms of the period. Ham Kick and Naked Dance, anyone? Ward emcees, with live period music with band leader Seva Venet. And who knows? We might even see a Baby Doll or two. New Orleans has always had a reputation as a wicked city; Storyville is at the heart of that sense of excess and openness. See why it continues to captivate and intrigue us a century later, even as we learn more about its many facets as these scholars of Storyville celebrate its lively legacy in history, theater, dance and music. Directed by Brook Hanemann.

Sunday, March 26th: “Place in the Heart: The History of New Orleans’ Beloved Landmarks.” Part of the Tennessee Williams Festival. At the Hotel Monteleone (214 Royal Street) in the Queen Anne Ballroom. 10am to 11:15am. Panel moderated by Errol Laborde with Pamela Tyler, Peggy Scott Laborde.

Sunday, March 26th: “Prohibition and Murder.” Part of the Tennessee Williams Festival. At the Hotel Monteleone (214 Royal Street) in the Queen Anne Ballroom. 11:30 to 12:45pm. Dramatic Readings by actors Kerry Cahill, Chris Lane, and Marie Lovejoy.

Friday, May 19th: “The Last Days of Storyville.” Part of the Tulane Alumni Association’s Educational and Cultural Sessions. Woldenberg Auditorium in Newcomb Art Museum. 11:15am to Noon.

Tuesday, June 20th: Private lecture for the Orleans Club.

Friday, June 23rd: “New Orleans Ladies of Burlesque.” Part of the New Orleans Women’s Leadership Conference hosted by FestiGals. I will be moderating a panel with Trixie Minx of Fleur de Tease Burlesque, May Hemmer (the Cocoa Barbie) and Nina Bozak, former Shim Shamettes Performer. At the JW Marriott New Orleans (614 Canal Street). 1:45 to 2:45pm. Tickets Available.

Tuesday, September 26th: Book Release Party at WYES for “New Orleans: The First 300 Years.” The book is part of WYES’ New Orleans Tricentennial Project which also includes on-air features, documentaries and award-winning Electronic Field Trips geared to grades 5 through 8 with partners such as The National WWII Museum on the city’s upcoming 300th anniversary. Book signing to follow with over a dozen contributors. 6:00pm to 8:00pm. 916 Navarre Ave.

 Thursday, September 28th: “New Orleans: The First 300 Years” book signing. Garden District Bookshop. I will be on a panel with Errol Laborde, Peggy Scott Laborde, Angus Lind, John Magill. Signing to follow. 6pm to 7:30pm. 2727 Prytania.

Thursday, October 19th:  “New Orleans: The First 300 Years” panel and book signing. I will be on panel with Peggy Scott Laborde, Errol Laborde, and Connie Atkinson. Jefferson Parish Library. 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie.

Wednesday, October 25th:: Private lecture for the Primetimers Club.

Thursday, October 26th: All Saints Soiree for Save Our Cemeteries. St. Louis Cemetery #3. 6:30pm to 9:30pm

Saturday, October 28th: Louisiana Book Festival. “New Orleans: The First 300 Years” I will be on a panel with Bronson Lutz, John Kemp, and Peter Ricchiuti moderated by editor Errol Laborde. 12:15pm to 1:15pm. Baton Rouge. State Capitol Building House, Committee Room 4.

Saturday, October 28thLouisiana Book Festival. Barnes and Noble Book Signing Tent. 1:30pm to 2:15pm.

Friday, November 3rd: Tulane University. LBC, Rechler Room. 3:30 – 4:15pm.

Wednesday, November 8th: Private Lecture for the VCPORA at Beauregard-Keyes House.

Monday, November 13th: Book launch for New Orleans & The World. Stage Door Canteen. 945 Magazine Street. 5pm to 7pm.

Saturday, November 25th: Arts Council’s Arts Market of New Orleans. Palmer Park. Corner of S. Carrollton & S. Claiborne. 10am – 4pm.

Sunday, November 26th: Arts Council’s Arts Market of New Orleans. Palmer Park. Corner of S. Carrollton & S. Claiborne. 10am – 4pm.

Saturday, December 2nd: Freret Market. Freret Street and Napoleon Ave. 12pm – 4pm.

Saturday, December 9th: Freret Market. Freret Street and Napoleon Ave. 12pm – 4pm.

Saturday, December 16th:: Arts Council’s Arts Market of New Orleans. Palmer Park. Corner of S. Carrollton & S. Claiborne. 10am – 4pm.

Sunday, December 17th: Arts Council’s Arts Market of New Orleans. Palmer Park. Corner of S. Carrollton & S. Claiborne. 10am – 4pm.

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Bourbon Festival

Lots of producing – not much promoting. Seems to be my mantra lately!

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But I am very excited to take part in this year’s Bourbon Festival! I will be speaking March 9, 2018 at Le Méridien Hotel (333 Poydras Street) from 11:15 to 12:15 on “Snake Charmers: New Orleans’ Female Bootleggers.”

Learn about the ladies of Prohibition: Snake Charmers, Volstead Vampires, Bootleggers’ Brides. Discover New Orleans women who fought for, rebelled against, and eventually reformed prohibition. Hear about the Flower Mission, Carrie Nation’s visit to New Orleans, “the wickedest but most hospitable city” in the South, the pretty redheaded coed who operated one of the most popular speakeasies in the city, and the trial of the Queen of the Booze Buccaneers of the Bahamas.

Local actors Donald Lewis and Amanda Alch do dramatic readings from newspaper articles, court transcripts, interviews, and letters.

As a bonus, the Seven Three Distillery Company will be serving a classic Prohibition cocktail – the Bee’s Knees made with their Gentilly Gin, honey, and lemon.

The festival looks amazing – tastings, seminars, dinner, burlesque! Get your tickets here! 

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2016 Come and Gone

I have been so busy producing that I have not done that good of a job promoting. Finally updated my shows/lectures for 2017.

Here is a look back on 2016.

UPCOMING SHOWS AND APPEARANCES FOR 2016

Please check back here frequently for updates and additions!

Some of my work is currently being show at the Cake Cafe at 2440 Chartres and SecondLine Arts & Antiques (formerly Greg’s Antiques) at 1209 Decatur.

Please remember that weather conditions may affect the markets’ times and dates. If in doubt, please check the night before the market for any possible changes.

Saturday, March 4th: Book Signing of “Stories from the St. Louis Cemeteries of New Orleans. 1850 House at 523 St. Ann Street from 2pm to 4pm.

Wednesday, April 6th: Panel “Life, Death, and Burial in New Orleans.” A Tulane Club Lifelong Learning Event. Moderated by David Johnson. With Cheryl Gerber, John Pope, and myself. Reception at 5:30. Panel at 6:00pm. Bea Field Alumni House. 6319 Willow Street. Register HERE.

Saturday, April 23rd: Book Signing of “Hope & New Orleans: A History of Crescent City Street Names” and “Stories from the St. Louis Cemeteries of New Orleans” with author Maggy Baccinelli “New Orleans Neighborhoods.” New Orleans Fairgrounds. Jazz Fest Book Tent. 2pm to 3pm.

Sunday, May 1st: Book Signing of “Hope & New Orleans: A History of Crescent City Street Names” and “Stories from the St. Louis Cemeteries of New Orleans.” 1pm to 2pm.

Sunday, April 24thSecondLine Arts & Antiques (formerly Greg’s Antiques) at 1209 Decatur. 8am to 4pm.

Wednesday, April 27th: Lecture and book signing with author Maggy Baccinelli “New Orleans Neighborhoods.” Part of New Orleans Libraries. Algiers Library. 3014 Holiday Drive.

Monday, May 9th: Lecture and book signing for Friends of the Cabildo Walking Tour Guides. The Cabildo. 10am.

Wednesday, May 11th: Lecture at St. Thomas Episcopal School for Heritage Day.

Friday, May 20th: Private lecture with the staff of Hermann-Grima/Gallier Historic Houses on the sinking of the Evening Star.

Friday, May 20th: Lecture on the sinking of the Evening Star. Book signing to follow of “Hope & New Orleans: A History of Crescent City Street Names” and ““Stories from the St. Louis Cemeteries of New Orleans.” Gallier House. 1132 Royal Street. Doors at 5:30pm. Lecture at 6:00pm.

Saturday, May 21st: SecondLine Arts & Antiques (formerly Greg’s Antiques) at 1209 Decatur. 10am to 6pm.

Saturday, July 16th: Save Our Cemeteries Annual Seminar. Lecture on “The History of Cremation in New Orleans.” Greenwood Cemetery & Mausoleum; 5200 Canal Blvd. Noon.

Tuesday, September 27th: Lecture for Delgado’s Tour Guide Class. 6:15pm.

Saturday, October 29: Arts Council of New Orleans‘ Arts Market. 10am to 4pm at Palmer Park, corner of S. Carrollton and S. Claiborne.

Saturday, November 5thFreret Market. 12pm to 4pm. Located at the intersection of Freret Street and Napoleon Avenue.

Saturday, November 26thArts Council of New Orleans‘ Arts Market. 10am to 4pm at Palmer Park, corner of S. Carrollton and S. Claiborne.

Sunday, November 27thArts Council of New Orleans‘ Arts Market. 10am to 4pm at Palmer Park, corner of S. Carrollton and S. Claiborne.

Saturday, December 3rd:  Freret Market. 12pm to 4pm. Located at the intersection of Freret Street and Napoleon Avenue.

Saturday, December 17thArts Council of New Orleans‘ Arts Market. 10am to 4pm at Palmer Park, corner of S. Carrollton and S. Claiborne.

Sunday, December 18thArts Council of New Orleans‘ Arts Market. 10am to 4pm at Palmer Park, corner of S. Carrollton and S. Claiborne.

 

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Evening Star lecture at the Gallier House

On Friday, May 20th, 6pm at the Gallier House in the French Quarter (1132 Royal Street – designed and built by James Gallier, Jr.) I will deliver a lecture on the Evening Star. I gave the lecture at the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities building last October but I have added new information and new photos. Lots to know!

The sinking of the Evening Star.

The sinking of the Evening Star.

The Evening Star was a luxury steamship en route from New York to New Orleans that encountered a hurricane off the coast of South Carolina. Of the nearly 300 passengers, an estimated 24 survived, making the maritime disaster one of the most deadly prior to the sinking of the Titanic in 1912. Fatalities included noted New Orleans architect James Gallier Sr. and his second wife, Catherine Maria Robinson, along with a French opera troupe, a circus company, and dozens of trafficked prostitutes destined to work New Orleans’ brothels. Public reaction and newspaper accounts of the era elicited both sympathy and scorn for those who died at sea. One prominent preacher, nothing the large number of prostitutes and performers on board, stated the ship was destined to sink since it was “loaded down with iniquity.”

Gallier's cenotaph at left. It was designed by his son.

Gallier’s cenotaph at left. It was designed by his son.

Doors open at 5:30pm and the lecture starts at 6pm. Afterward, I will be signing copies of my books Hope & New Orleans: A History of Crescent City Street Names (just had its second printing) and Stories from the St. Louis Cemeteries of New Orleans.

Hope to see y’all out!

 

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1920 Mardi Gras

What a crazy and busy year! So much to catch up on.

Anyway, here is a mini documentary on Mardi Gras 1920 that I did for the local PBS station, WYES. It focuses on General John Joseph “Black Jack” Pershing’s visit to New Orleans during the first “dry” Mardi Gras.

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It debuted at the 2016 Rex Ball.

Many thanks to Peggy Scott Laborde, who co-produced it with me and encouraged me to be more perky.

Thank you to the very talented and amazing Larry Roussarie who helped me edit it.

Thank you to Terrence Fitzmorris, associate dean of the Tulane School of Continuing Studies for agreeing to be interviewed.

Thank you to the talented Will Burdette, Kerry Cahill and Dane Rhodes for lending their fabulous vocals.

Thank you to the patient camera man Paul Combel

Archival Acknowledgements: Howard-Tilton Memorial Library, Tulane University; University Archives, Tulane University; Historic Collection of New Orleans.

Special Thanks to: Sean Benjamin, Ann Case, Scott Frilot, John Haffner, and Lee Miller.

Here it is: General John Pershing Visits Mardi Gras.

 

 

 

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Lifelong Learning Event

TAAOfficial Release from an event I am doing on Wednesday, April 6th.

FUN FUN FUN!

A Tulane Club of New Orleans Lifelong Learning event:

“Life, Death, and Burial in New Orleans”

Wednesday, April 6
5:30 p.m. ~ Reception
6 p.m. ~ Panel followed by book signing

REGISTER HERE

Bea Field Alumni House
6319 Willow Street
New Orleans, LA 70130
(corner of Willow and Calhoun)

$10 admission

Join us as a panel of local authors discuss the traditions and myths surrounding life, death, and burials in the City of New Orleans.

The event will be moderated by David Johnson, communications associate for the Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses in the French Quarter. For 24 years he served as executive editor of Louisiana Cultural Vistas, the award-winning quarterly arts-and-culture magazine of the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities.

On the panel: 

Sally Asher (“Hope & New Orleans: A History of Crescent City Street Names” and “Stories from the St. Louis Cemeteries of New Orleans.”) holds two master’s degrees from Tulane University and has been the public relations photographer since 2008. She frequently lectures on New Orleans history through the Louisiana State Museum and is on the board of Save Our Cemeteries. Asher is currently working on a book about Prohibition in New Orleans to be published by LSU Press in 2017 and is contributing a chapter to a New Orleans tricentennial book to be published by Pelican Press.

Cheryl Gerber (“Life and Death in the Big Easy”) is a freelance journalist and documentary photographer working in New Orleans, where she was born. She has been s regular contributor to The New York Times, the Associated Press, New Orleans Magazine, and has been a staff photographer for Gambit Weekly since 1994. During the past two decades, Cheryl has won several awards from the New Orleans Press Club for her work on social issues and news photography.

John Pope (“Getting Off at Elysian Fields”) has been a reporter in New Orleans since 1972 and was a member of The Times-Picayune’s team that won two Pulitzer Prizes and a George Polk Award for coverage of Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. “Getting Off at Elysian Fields,” an anthology of 123 of his obituaries and stories of four funerals he covered, was published in October by the University Press of Mississippi and is in its second printing.

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2015 Year in Review

My calendar from last year.

UPCOMING SHOWS AND APPEARANCES FOR 2015

Please check back here frequently for updates and additions!

Some of my work is currently being show at the Cake Cafe at 2440 Chartres.

Please remember that weather conditions may affect the markets’ times and dates. If in doubt, please check the night before the market for any possible changes.

Saturday, June 6th: Book signing of Hope & New Orleans: A History of Crescent City Street Names. The Bolden Bar – part of The New Orleans Jazz Market. From 5pm to 8pm. 1436 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd.

Saturday, September 12th: Lecture: “New Orleans’ Snake Charmers: Female Bootleggers” Part of the Downriver: Mighty Mississippi River Festival 2015. 2pm. 3rd Floor of the U.S. Mint. 400 Esplanade.

Saturday, September 26thArts Council of New Orleans Arts Market. 10am to 4pm at Palmer Park, corner of S. Carrollton and S. Claiborne.

Saturday, October 3rdFreret Market. 12pm to 4pm. Located at the intersection of Freret Street and Napoleon Avenue.

Monday, October 19thBOOK RELEASE! My new book “Stories from St. Louis Cemeteries of New Orleans is now available. Woo-Hoo!

Saturday, October 24th: Book Signing of “Stories from St. Louis Cemeteries of New Orleans  at the 1850 House. 523 St. Ann Street. 1pm to 3pm.

Saturday, October 24th: Book Release Party for “Stories from St. Louis Cemeteries of New Orleans  and New Orleans Neighborhoods by Maggy Baccinelli. 6pm to 9pm at Treo. 3835 Tulane Avenue. Music, drink specials, and books!

Thursday, October 29th: “Tales from the Crypt & Deep Sea: Marie Laveau’s Tomb and the Evening Star Shipwreck.” Historian Carolyn Morrow Long discusses the long history and mysteries surrounding Marie Laveau’s tomb in St. Louis Cemetery No. 1. Afterward, my presentation on the 1866 shipwreck of the Evening Star. Louisiana Humanities. 938 Lafayette. 6pm to 8pm.

Saturday, October 31st:  Louisiana Book Festival. Baton Rouge State Capital. 3:15pm to 4pm. Senate Room Committee Room A. I will be moderating “Hallowed Grounds” panel.

4:15 to 5pm Book Signing.

Tuesday, November 3rd: Book Signing of “Stories from St. Louis Cemeteries of New Orleans  at theGarden District Book Shop with Maggy Baccinelli. 2727 Prytania Street. 6-7:30pm.

Thursday, November 5th: Appearance with Cheryl Gerber and John Pope on “The Sound of Salvation with Chris Rose.” WHIV Radio. 102.3 FM

Saturday, November 7th Freret Market. 12pm to 4pm. Located at the intersection of Freret Street and Napoleon Avenue.

Tuesday, November 10th:“Taken to the Grave: Lesser Known Tombs in St. Louis Cemeteries.” Sponsored by Save Our Cemeteries. Free and open to the public. 6:30pm. Lake Lawn Metairie Funeral Home. 5100 Ponchartrain Blvd. Book Signing to Follow.

Friday, November 27th: Appearance on “Steppin’ Out.” 7:30pm on WYES.

Saturday, November 28thArts Council of New Orleans‘ Arts Market. 10am to 4pm at Palmer Park, corner of S. Carrollton and S. Claiborne.

Sunday, November 29thArts Council of New Orleans Arts Market. 10am to 4pm at Palmer Park, corner of S. Carrollton and S. Claiborne.

Wednesday, December 2nd“Reading Between the Wines” with Maggy Baccinelli. 6pm to 8pm at Pearl Wine Company, 3700 Orleans Ave. Sponsored by Tubby & Coo’s Mid-City Bookshop.

Saturday, December 5th:  Freret Market. 12pm to 4pm. Located at the intersection of Freret Street and Napoleon Avenue.

Saturday, December 12th:  Freret Market. 12pm to 4pm. Located at the intersection of Freret Street and Napoleon Avenue.

Saturday, December 12th: Book Signing at Kitchen Witch Cookbooks. 1452 N. Broad Street. 3pm to 5pm. There will be wine and gift wrapping!

Saturday, December 19th: Arts Council of New Orleans Arts Market. 10am to 4pm at Palmer Park, corner of S. Carrollton and S. Claiborne.

Sunday, December 20th: Arts Council of New Orleans Arts Market. 10am to 4pm at Palmer Park, corner of S. Carrollton and S. Claiborne.

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Book Signing March 4th at 1850 House

I will be doing my first book-signing of the year for Stories from the St. Louis Cemeteries of New Orleans, this Saturday, March 4th at the 1850 House, 523 St. Ann Street in Jackson Square from 2pm to 4pm. Come by and chat about cemeteries – and I can tell you about some recent discoveries!

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